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Ethics of Identifying Your Client: It's Not Always Easy (Live Replay from October 29, 2021)

Description

The first step in every ethics analysis is answering the question, who is your client? It's seemingly a very easy question to answer, but it's not always 20/20 except in hindsight.

Representing multiple parties on the same matter, whether in litigation or on a transaction, may mean you have many clients, some or all with conflicts. If you're a private practitioner and you represent an organization, your client may be the entity, its officers from whom you are taking directions, or possibly both. If you're an in-house attorney, the analysis – and its implications for the attorney-client privilege – becomes even more complex.

This program provides a real world guide to ethics of identifying your client in a variety of settings avoiding conflicts of interest with the client.

  • Ethics and identifying your client and avoiding conflicts in transactions and litigation
  • Representing businesses entities, nonprofit associations, and the government – client v. person giving directions
  • Identifying clients in trust and estate planning – the testator or the person paying your fees?
  • Special ethical challenges and ethical risks for in-house counsel and attorney-client privilege issues
  • How to untangle clients and conflicts in joint representations – managing conflicts and information flows
  • Best practices in documenting client representation to avoid later challenge

Contributors

  • Elizabeth Treubert Simon

    Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump's offices worldwide. Previously, her practice focused on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures. She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Rules of Professional Conduct Rules Review Committee. She is the immediate past chair of the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee. She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues. She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School.

    Click here for more information about Elizabeth.

September 2, 2022
Fri 1:00 PM EDT

Duration 1H 0M

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